Accessibility Options

Accessibility Options

Did you know that most computers have options built into them to make it easier for people with low or no vision to use them.Click for information
Nursing Homes - List of UK Nursing Homes & Care Homes Business DirectoryBusiness Lists UK - Find the right health information and advice
Nursing And Care Business Directory

Caremark Liverpool Blog

15/06/2021 - Respect & Recognition

We are very proud of the recognition we have received since opening our doors in April 2020.

We are really proud of our carer & support workers and the exceptional work they do for our clients every day. Every single member of our Caremark Liverpool team embodies the values of our company: Compassion, Integrity & Professionalism. We appreciate them so much, and from the reviews and compliments we have received from clients and their families, they do too!

Following this blog, each week I will be celebrating a member of staff.  A one page profile of each team member, so you can get to know the type of people we have available to support you or a loved one.

We would love to discuss your individual home care requirements, be it by meeting, by email or over the telephone at a time that is convenient to you. If you would like to discuss this with one of the team, please get in touch on 0151 345 0520. Alternatively you can send us an email to Liverpool@caremark.co.uk

19/05/2021 - Care for Others. Make a Difference

Now that lockdown restrictions are easing for many of us, I thought I would use this blog to remind us that not all of us were in lockdown.

A massive thank you goes out to all the Carers that have worked throughout the UK to keep our loved ones safe.

We believe that you are truly remarkable and deserve the recognition throughout these exceptionally demanding and challenging times.

Thank you for your care and kindness, you really do make a difference to people’s lives every single day.

If you are interested in working in social care and have the passion to help others, then visit everydayisdifferent.com to explore roles available in social care.  You can also visit our website (www.caremark.co.uk/locations/liverpool/jobs) to see the roles currently available.

#CareForOthers #MakeADifference #ThankyouCareWorkers

26/03/2021 - An easy guide to Direct Payments

Giving you the Choice and Control

This guide is for people who want to know more about direct payments. Direct payments are a different way of getting the support you need. 
We hope this guide will help you work out if direct payments might be right for you.

About Direct Payments
A direct payment is money your Social Services can give you. It is a different way of getting the support you need. You use it to buy the support you want. 
Social Services give you the money instead of a service. You spend the money on getting the support you need. 
Most people who use Social Services from the council could get a direct payment. Your Social Worker should talk to you about direct payments when they look at what care you need. You must have a bank account for the direct payment. If you don’t have one now, it is easy to set one up. You will need to write down how you spend your direct payment. Lots of people get someone called a book keeper to help with this. A book keeper is someone who works out things to do with money for you. You could use an agency. An agency is a business that sells you care services, like support staff. Most councils have set up direct payments support to help people use direct payments. They can help you understand and run your direct payment. They sort out some of the hard things with you.
From April 2003 all councils must tell people if they can get direct payments. This is a new rule.

About Support
Support can mean different things. Here are some of the types of support you might know about. 
  • Support from a place or team of people like a day centre, community team or staff where you live. 
  • Support with personal things like having a bath, washing or getting dressed. 
  • Support to live in your own house like help with money, cooking or cleaning the house. 
  • Support to get out and about like driving you to see friends, help to join in things with other people, or someone to go on holiday with you.
How direct payments work
  1.  The government gives money to councils all over the country. This money pays for services – things like day centres, places to live and other types of support. These services are run or paid for by Social Services – a part of the council.
  2.  Social Services get a bit of money for every person using social care services. Social Services put all this money together. When you get a service from Social Services, it is paid for by this money.
  3.  Some people are not happy with the support they get from Social Services. Some people want to do new or different things. Now they can choose to have a direct payment instead of using services.
  4. Social Services must tell you if you can get a direct payment. If you say yes to a direct payment, you take your bit of money back. You spend this money on getting support that you choose. You must spend it on support that Social Services agree you need. 

Things you should know
Most people who use Social Services from a council could get a direct payment. There are only a few times when councils won’t let people have a direct payment. 
Councils can’t make you have a direct payment if you don’t want one. 
Direct payments are a good way of you being the boss of your own life. You are in charge. You choose what services you use, when you use them and who you get them from. 
Being a boss means being in charge of people. It is important that you treat people fairly.
You must have a bank account for the direct payment. If you don’t have one now, it is easy to set one up. 
You will need to write down how you spend your direct payment. Lots of people get someone called a book keeper to help with this. A book keeper is someone who works out things to do with money for you. 
You could use an agency. An agency is a business that sells you care services, like support staff. 
Most councils have set up direct payments support to help people use direct payments. They can help you understand and run your direct payment. They sort out some of the hard things with you.
You must have a bank account for the direct payment. If you don’t have one now, it is easy to set one up. You will need to write down how you spend your direct payment. Lots of people get someone called a book keeper to help with this. A book keeper is someone who works out things to do with money for you. You could use an agency. An agency is a business that sells you care services, like support staff. Most councils have set up direct payments support to help people use direct payments. They can help you understand and run your direct payment. They sort out some of the hard things with you.
You could use direct payments to:
  • Pay someone to support you in a job 
  • Pay someone to support you at college
  • Get support with personal care – things like having a bath, washing or getting dressed 
  • Get support with cooking or cleaning your house 
  • Get support to do sport or leisure 
  • Get support for a short break
  • You can get support during the day instead of going to a day centre. 
  • You can get support to live in your own home instead of living in a care home. 
The council will let you know what you can and can’t spend the money on. 
You need to tell them your plans for buying services. If you still want to use some Social Services the council might be able to sort out a mix of direct payments and Social Services. 

Next week we will be looking at Getting Direct Payments.

In the meantime if you require any further information or would like to set up a meeting to discuss your care needs. please get in touch on 0151 345 0520. Alternatively you can send us an email to Liverpool@caremark.co.uk

08/02/2021 - Direct Payments - what are they?

Direct payments allow you to receive cash payments from your local authority instead of community care services. This can give you much more flexibility and control, allowing you to arrange your own care services and choosing the home care service of your choice.

Who can have them?
You have the right to receive direct payments if one of the following applies:
  • aged over 16 and local authority has decided you are entitled to community care services
  • you have parental responsibility for a child under 16 who is entitled to community care services

Agreeing to direct payments
You can only have direct payments if you, or someone acting on your behalf, agrees to the payments being made.  To be able to give this consent you, or the person acting on your behalf, must have the mental capacity to give consent.
To give consent you do not have to fully understand the direct payments process.  You don't have to be able to manage the direct payments on your own.

How much should you get
How much you receive must be high enough to cover the reasonable cost of the service you require to meet your identified care needs.
Like when receiving direct care services from the local authority you may still need to make a contribution towards your care costs.  The local authority will inform you of the amount of contribution that is required, the most this can be is £100 a week.
If you feel that your contribution is too much or that your direct payments are not enough to cover the care service required, then you can raise a dispute with the local authority.

Monitoring and reviews
The local authority will review both your care and direct payment agreement regularly to ensure the service you are receiving is meeting your needs.
When monitoring your direct payments the local authority will monitor your mental capacity, and look at how payments are being used and managed.

Problems with direct payments
If the local authority thinks that your direct payments are not being used properly, they can ask you to repay part or all of the payment.
If you are asked to repay a direct payment you must source advice first, you can get advice from the Citizens Advice Bureau.

Support for people using direct payments
There is a lot of support available to help you manage your direct payments.  Your local authority may help you to access a payroll service or advise on direct payment managing services.

Using direct payments for care
  • Buying care at home - buying services from a home care agency, or employing a personal assistant
  • Employing carers - if you do decide to employ a carer or personal assistance, you need to be aware of your responsibilities, as you will be an employer.  For example, you will have to arrange recruitment, insurance, sick pay and other employee benefits and will need to keep records and accounts
  • Care home stays - can be used for short respite stays in a care home
  • Equipment - can use to buy equipment or adaptations required in your own home

We would love to discuss your individual home care requirements, be it by meeting, by email or over the telephone at a time that is convenient to you. If you would like to discuss this with one of the team, please get in touch on 0151 345 0520. Alternatively you can send us an email to Liverpool@caremark.co.uk

12/01/2021 - Better Health! Lets Do This!

Its January, time for resolutions, change and healthy boosts!

Is there something you’d like to change in your life right now, like losing a bit of weight, getting active, sleeping better, or improving your mood. NHS Better Health has lots of free easy ideas and support to help.

Nutrition Key Message
When it comes to fruit and veg; the more the better!  Get your 5 A Day.  They're low in calories.
Fact: 81% of men aged 65-74 year are overweight or living with obesity, compared to 69% for women aged65-74 years.

Physical Activity Key Message
It is never too late to get active to improve your health, so start small and build up starting with 10 minutes of brisk walking a day
Fact: To stay fit and healthy, it's recommended you get at least 150 minutes of moderate physical activity a week, or around 20 to 30 minutes a day

So how can Caremark (Liverpool) help with Better Health?
Preparing meals - We will make sure that your nutritional needs are met through healthy, well-balanced meals, and ensure any specific dietary requirements are followed.  We can also help set up a weekly menu and record/diary your meals.
Social Support - We can support you to become more active, visit a gym, go swimming, aqua aerobics or a walk around the local park.  Whatever your age, experience or ability we can support you in the activity you enjoy.

We can provide a service that is tailored to you, visit at times that suit you!

Better Health! Lets Do This!

#BetterHealth

Learn more about our services on our website or call 0151 345 0520 to find out how we can help you or a loved one.

07/01/2021 - Lockdown 3: STAY HOME, SAVE LIVES

Lockdown 3: Stay at Home
Coronavirus cases are rising rapidly across the country, and with the new variant making it more difficult to control, the government decided on the 5th January to put England in to a new Lockdown.

National lockdown: stay at home messaging
  • You must stay at home. This is the single most important action we can all take to protect the NHS and save lives.
  • You must not leave your home unless necessary.
  • Stay 2 metres apart from anyone not in your household or bubble.

We must keep on protecting each other

So how can Caremark (Liverpool) help?
  • Socialising - it is advised that you stay at home.  Our Care staff can offer companionship, they can visit you as often as is needed to offer support and add that all-important human element to your day
  • Shopping - Our Care staff can assist with online shopping by helping you order your items online and be there when the delivery arrives to put your shopping away.  They can also go to the local supermarket, with a list of items you require, and bring back to you the same day and put everything away for you.
  • Medicines - As you are advised to not attend a pharmacy, our care staff can collect your medications from your nominated pharmacy.  If you require assistance with ordering your medication, our care staff can organise this also.
  • Care and Support - If family are unable to assist you due to shielding or ill health, our care staff can support you in any area you require assistance in, such as Personal Care, Meal Preparation, Domestic Tasks etc.

Limit Contact

Further limits to interaction between households help in our fight to control the spread of coronavirus, particularly in light of the highly transmissible new variant.
FIND OUT MORE

If you feel that you or a loved one would like more support at this time, then please call us on 0151 345 0520 to organise a FREEassessment

14/12/2020 - 9 Mistakes to Avoid when Caring for Someone with Dementia or Alzheimer's

Learn more about our Dementia and Alzheimer's services on our website or call 0151 345 0520 to find out how we can help you or your loved one.

09/12/2020 - Coronavirus (COVID-19) Vaccine

Who can get the COVID-19 vaccine
The NHS is currently offering the COVID-19 vaccine to people most at risk from coronavirus.

At this time, the vaccine is being offered in some hospitals to:
  • some people aged 80 and over who already have a hospital appointment in the next few weeks
  • people who work in care homes
  • health care workers at high risk

The vaccine will be offered more widely, and at other locations, as soon as possible.

Social care workers can now get the free, MHRA approved vaccine.  

Don't forget, you need two doses to be protected against COVID-19, so you can keep caring for others.
 

Approved!

An effective vaccine will be the best way to protect the most vulnerable from coronavirus and the biggest breakthrough since the pandemic began.
FIND OUT MORE

Wait to be contacted

The NHS will let you know when it's your turn to have the vaccine. It's important not to contact the NHS for a vaccination before then.
FIND OUT MORE

Please call today to book a FREE assessment - 0151 345 0520 

Our Care and Support staff can help with booking and attending hospital appointments, or any other support you may require in accessing the community.

03/12/2020 - Staying Safe this Winter

This time of year can feel isolating, so do what you can to make sure you stay safe this winter.

  • Check smoke alarms are working
Contact your local fire service as they might be able to come round and do a free home fire safety check for you. You may even be eligible to get free smoke alarms fitted.

  • Install a carbon monoxide alarm
That makes a sound, place one in each room with a gas or solid-fuel burning appliance.

  • Consider fitting a grab rail 
If you have steps at your front or back door, grab rails are a great safety tool and support, especially in wet or icy weather. Ask your local Age UK for more information, they also have a guide on their website called 'Adapting your home' which is useful.

  • Keep a torch handy 
In case there’s a power cut, you will have something at hand. You could also keep things like the radio, mobile phone, laptop or tablet charged up, just in case.

  • Have someone check in
Could you ask someone to pop over just to check in if there’s an extended period of particularly cold weather?  Have you thought about having a regular care and support worker to pop in maybe once a week, this can also help with any loneliness you may be experiencing.  Care and Support Workers can spend as little as 30 minutes with you, having a chat and a cup of tea or if you would like to complete an activity they can stay longer.

  • Keep emergency numbers nearby
Write down emergency numbers, such as your Gas, Water and Electricity suppliers, plumber, pharmacy and GP practice and keep them by your phone.

Learn more about our companionship services on our website or call 0151 345 0520 to find out how we can help you or your loved one.


25/11/2020 - Tips for keeping our elderly community safe this winter

Keep Moving 
Try not to sit still for more than one hour at a time. You might not think it, but even a little bit of activity can help you to keep strength and mobility.

Eat Well 
Spending more time indoors more and doing less of the things we enjoy means it can be difficult to keep up the motivation to prepare meals. Try to keep a bit of a routine and eat what you can.

Flu Jab 
Everyone aged 65 and over, and anyone who cares for a friend or family member, is entitled to a free flu jab from the doctor or pharmacist.

Warm Home 
Try to heat your home to a steady and comfortable temperature throughout the day. It's also a good idea to keep your bedroom window closed at night when the weather is coldest and close the curtains at dusk to keep the heat in.

Wrap up Well 
Layering's the best way to keep warm in winter. If you're heading out, don’t forget the temperature can drop drastically as the sun goes down so take woollies out with you, even if you don’t need them immediately. It could be a good idea to stock up on cold and sore throat remedies. Your pharmacist can give you advice if you're feeling under the weather about what might help.

Wash your hands regularly 
This is important now more than ever. It's simple but effective – washing your hands helps stop germs spreading and can help you stay well.

19/11/2020 - Safeguarding Adults Week 2020

This week we are supporting #SafeguardingAdultsWeek hosted by the @AnnCraftTrust! Make sure to watch their page for updates and helpful resources throughout the week. Below are some of the themes they are covering this week.  If you would like more of an insight to what Safeguarding is then head over to their website anncraftrust.org

Safeguarding & Wellbeing
  • There’s a strong link between safeguarding and mental and physical wellbeing. 
  • If someone’s wellbeing is suffering, they may consider certain actions that put them at risk. 
  • It's important to look after yourself. But it's just as important to look out for others. 
  • Learn to spot the signs that someone might not be doing so well. And don't be afraid to ask: "Are you OK?"

Understanding Safeguarding Legislation 
  • All safeguarding matters are governed by certain legislation, including The Care Act and The Mental Capacity Act. 
  • This legislation might seem confusing at first. But all of it is designed to be as easy as possible to understand and apply. 
  • In the resources section of the anncrafttrust.org site, you’ll find an overview of numerous relevant laws and initiatives. 
  • Find the resources here: anncrafttrust.org/resources/safeguarding-adultslegislation/ 

Organisational Abuse 
  • Organisational abuse includes neglect and poor care practice within a specific care setting. This could be a hospital or a care home, but also the care you receive in your own home. 
  • Organisational abuse doesn’t have to involve physical violence. It can be something as small as insisting that a person in care must drink their tea at the same time every day. 
  • The abuse can either be a one-off incident or an ongoing culture of ill-treatment. 
  • Learn to spot the signs of organisational abuse, and find out what to do if you have concerns: anncrafttrust.org/institutional-abuse-definitions-signssymptoms/

What Is Adult Grooming? 
  • Grooming is a form of abuse that involves manipulating someone until they’re isolated, dependent, and more vulnerable to exploitation. 
  • When most people think about grooming, they think about children. But adults are vulnerable to grooming too. 
  • Grooming can lead to many different types of harm, including modern slavery, physical, sexual and financial abuse. 
  • Learn to spot the signs of adult grooming: anncrafttrust.org/signs-of -grooming-in-adults-what-to-watch-out-for/

Learn more about our services on our website or call 0151 345 0520 to find out how we can help you or your loved one.


09/11/2020 - Lockdown 2: National Restrictions

England went in to Lockdown 2 on 5th November 2020.  
The Government have taken the following action:
  1. Requiring people to stay at home, except for specific purposes.
  2. Preventing gathering with people you do not live with, except for specific purposes.
  3. Closing certain businesses and venues, like hospitality and non-essential retail.

So what does this mean for the most vulnerable people in our society?

If you are 60+ or clinically vulnerable, be especially careful to follow the rules and minimise contact with others.  If you are clinically extremely vulnerable you are advised to stay at home as much as possible, except to go outdoors for exercise or to attend essential health appointments.

So how can Caremark (Liverpool) help?
  • Socialising - it is advised that you stay at home as much as possible.  Our Care staff can offer companionship, they can visit you as often as is needed to offer support and add that all-important human element to your day
  • Shopping - Our Care staff can assist with online shopping by helping you order your items online and be there when the delivery arrives to put your shopping away.  They can also go to the local supermarket, with a list of items you require, and bring back to you the same day and put everything away for you.
  • Medicines - As you are advised to not attend a pharmacy, our care staff can collect your medications from your nominated pharmacy.  If you require assistance with ordering your medication, our care staff can organise this also.
  • Care and Support - If family are unable to assist you due to shielding or ill health, our care staff can support you in any area you require assistance in, such as Personal Care, Meal Preparation, Domestic Tasks etc.

26/10/2020 - Local COVID Alert Levels - what are they?

With the new LOCAL COVID ALERT LEVEL Tier System now in place, and changing day by day for different areas in the UK, I thought it might be useful to look at each Level set by the Government.  I will be looking at each one more closely each day, and these blogs will be posted to our Facebook page throughout the week.

What we do want you to know is that Caremark (Liverpool) is fully operational and taking extra precautions to keep people safe.

During the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic we are operating a normal service, with the office open and ready to support new and existing clients who need assistance at home.

The safety and wellbeing of the people we care for and our staff is of paramount importance. To ensure this we have implemented a number of extra steps in accordance with the latest expert advice, including ensuring all our care workers have and wear personal protective equipment (PPE) such as masks, eyewear, aprons and gloves.

If you feel that you or a loved one would like more support in your day to day lives, then please call us on 0151 345 0520 to organise a FREE assessment.

If you feel would like to continue following our COVID blog updates this week, please take a look and 'LIKE & FOLLOW' ourFacebookpage.

12/10/2020 - Help Us, Help You - Accessing NHS Services

This week the NHS has launched a campaign to address the barriers that are deterring patients from accessing NHS services.

Caremark Liverpool like to work closely with the NHS, and feel this is an important campaign to get behind.

We would like to encourage you to contact your GP if you are worried about a symptom that could be cancer.  Caremark Liverpool can support you with this, we can assist you to book appointments with GP's or other health professionals.  We can also accompany you to appointments.

Just Speak to Your GP

Unexpected bleeding, like blood in your poo or pee, could be a sign of cancer.  It's probably nothing serious, but finding cancer early makes it more treatable.

Just Speak to Your GP

An unexplained lump could be a sign of cancer.  It's probably nothing serious, but finding cancer early makes it more treatable.

With COVID-19 and the extra restrictions that Liverpool are now having to implement; you may find that you are spending more time indoors with your elderly relatives.

But just because you are staying in, doesn’t mean you can’t have some fun!

Here are some activities to keep you all entertained and active:

  1. Card Games – so many options of games; Snap, Pairs, Whist or Rummy to name but a few.
  2. Seated Exercises – ensure you use stable chairs with no arms.  You could do basic moves like actions from ‘Wheels on the Bus’ or search online for seated exercise plans aimed at the elderly.
  3. Memory Game – all you need is a tray and several small items (e.g. cup, pen, purse etc).  Allow the person to study the items on the tray for a few minutes, then cover the tray with a cloth and see how many items they can remember.
  4. Crossword Puzzles – you can source cryptic crosswords or easier/general knowledge type.  If your elderly relative has a decline in vision you could print enlarged versions of the crosswords so that you can complete it together.
  5. Be Creative – think of a project that the whole family can get involved in, such as scrapbooks, organizing family photo albums, or making a family recipe book.

Don’t forget that your elderly relative can teach you games that they enjoy, this will encourage conversation and stimulate memories.

Having companionship is vital; and is something we at Caremark can help with.  To put your mind at rest, while out at work, our care and support workers can visit your elderly relative in their home and encourage activities that can help with keeping both their mind and body active.

Learn more about our companionship services on our website or call 0151 345 0520 to find out how we can help you or your loved one.


21/09/2020 - How to wash your hands effectively

With Liverpool going in to a ‘local lockdown’ tomorrow, I thought it was important to remind everyone of the importance of effective hand washing.

Hand washing is vital to reduce the spread of infection.  Hands should be washed thoroughly using a squirt of a hand wash, the water should be warm to the touch.

The following seven steps explain the correct way to wash your hands:

1. Wet the hands with warm water and use a hand wash to build up a later

2. Wash the hands with palms facing and remember to wash between the fingers

3. Wash the backs of both hands, again remember to wash between each of the fingers

4. Link the fingers of one hand and continue to wash.  Ensure the tips of the fingers are washed

5. Wash the thumbs of each hand thoroughly using one hand to wash the opposite thumb

6. Wash the palms of each hand as this is an area often neglected

7. Finally, wash the wrists.  The hands are then rinsed thoroughly and dried on disposable paper towels (or on a clean hand towel)

(Please see the picture above for visual guide)

14/09/2020 - Why goal setting is still important for Seniors

This week we found out that we are the winners of the bark.com ‘Certificate of Excellence’ 2020.  This made me think about goals and how we all set them in both our personal and work life, and that the sense of achievement is one of the best feelings we have.

So, this week’s blog is about the types of goals our elderly relatives can set themselves, as there is no age limit on goal setting or having that sense of achievement feeling!

Some great goals for seniors might be:

  • Health and fitness – e.g. aim to walk for 30 minutes 2 or 3 times a week
  • Family and community – e.g. learn how to use video chat and call grandchildren every Sunday
  • Personal Purpose – e.g. become a volunteer, use your free time to help a charity
  • Independence – e.g. set a daily routine to help make independent living more manageable and enjoyable, make calls to orgainse help in areas that you struggle in, such as domestic chores
  • Creativity – e.g. attend a community centre, find groups that interest you, such as art classes, cookery classes
  • Fun – e.g. once a month do a new activity, such as see a new movie at the cinema, eat at a new restaurant

When our clients join our service based on their individual need’s assessment, we create set outcomes of support, which are ‘goals.’  These are under the following categories:

  • Assist to Access the Local Community, e.g. attend a day centre
  • Being Safe in and Around the Home, e.g. maintenance checks (fire alarms)
  • Developing and Maintaining Personal Relationships, e.g. help organise friends to come over for tea and chat
  • Maintaining a Habitable Home, e.g. assist with domestic chores
  • Maintaining Personal Hygiene, e.g. to help with a daily shower
  • Managing and Maintaining Nutrition, e.g. to prepare an evening meal
  • Medication Management, e.g. to be reminded to take medication at correct times
  • Work and Learning, e.g. to support you to learn how to use video chatting feature
  • Money Management, e.g. to assist to pay bills or collect pension
  • Health and Wellbeing, e.g. to support you to attend hospital appointments

Our Care and Support Workers are always trained to assist clients in the above categories and promote independence .

If you would like to find out more, please call for a FREE assessment on 0151 345 0520

31/08/2020 - A day in the life of a Live in Carer


To help celebrate Professional Care Worker’s Week (1st-4th September 2020) I thought this week’s blog could look at a typical 24 hours of a Live-In Carer.

8am – Support to get up, assist to shower safely and brush teeth.

9am – Help to get ready for the day; put on clothing and style hair.

9.30am – Prepare a healthy breakfast and administer medication.

10am – Complete general household chores, such as mopping, change bedding, clean dishes etc.

11am – A cup of tea and a chat; let’s not forget that Live-In Carers are there for companionship also.

12pm – Assist to access the community and meet up with friends; this could include having lunch.

2pm – Encourage light exercise, go for a stroll in a local park.

2.30pm – Promote mental well-being by suggesting puzzles, board games or crosswords to help keep the mind active.

3.30pm – Visit family or invite family over.  If geographical distance is an issue introduce technology such as Skype, or social media.

5.30pm – Reminiscence activities; use old photos, films, music etc to engage and encourage conversation.

7pm – Prepare dinner; a home-cooked balanced meal; monitoring nutrition and hydration always.

9pm – Get ready for bed; change into nightwear, take medication, and brush teeth.

10pm – Live-in carer goes to bed, but available through the night.

If you want to find out more about our live-in care services, contact the friendly team at Caremark (Liverpool) today.

24/08/2020 - Why Choose Homecare? Why Choose Us?

  • We are flexible - your care and support is tailored around you; ensuring that each person has an arrangement agreed based upon their individual needs and preferences.

  • We don't compromise independence - staff are trained to encourage independence at all times.  We are here to support and assist you to maintain your independence.

  • We deliver a personal service - our staff and clients build trust and supportive relationships, as we match our clients with the staff they have the most in common with.  We then ensure that we keep the staff team working with clients to a minimum.  You will be introduced to every staff member who will work with you.

 
Our Values

Compassion - It is in our nature to really want to help people, whether it is our clients, members of our team or friends or family.  We simply are the sort of people who get enjoyment from making a difference to people’s lives.  This is what drives us as individuals and a brand.

Professionalism- We can do our job best when everyone else does their job best.  Whatever part we play, however well we do it, it will have a significant impact on the quality of the care we provide.  We believe that we should always do our best for the people who are affected by our actions. We are proud that people know that they can rely on us to do our job properly.

Integrity - We believe in honesty and sticking to our principles, and we won’t change these for anyone.  This is what gives us our character and makes others trust us.  We will tell the truth; keep our promises and we always know what the right thing to do is and we are never afraid to do it.  This is our greatest achievement.

17/08/2020 - Why is maintaining independence important?

I often speak to relatives of a loved one who is requiring some level of care and support, but their loved one is worried that if they accept support, they will lose their independence.  Once I am able to meet the person I am able to explain that what the care and support workers do is to support them in maintaining their independence, as our goal is to assist them to remain in their own home.

The following are 4 reasons why it is important to empower older adults to live independent lives:

1. Feel like an individual
It is important that we encourage them to make choices throughout the day, like the clothes they wear and the food they eat. It is also essential that they have a sense of self in the home that they live in, being able to have their belongings they care about and enjoy.

2. Maintain balance and strength
Motivating older adults to stay active will not only promote independence but result in health benefits too.  Maintaining strength and balance reduces the risk of falls, as falls can lead to long-term loss of independence.

3. Sense of purpose

Independence gives older adults a sense of purpose; they can continue enjoying the activities they have always done and be an active part of families and friends lives.

4. Helps with memory skills
Memory loss gradually happens as we age, however maintaining independence and being active will boost memory skills.  Daily routines also promote both memory and independence.

At Caremark Liverpool we believe that everyone should have the opportunity to live independently.  We offer homecare and live-in services that can meet the individual needs of older people, who want to remain in their own homes.

Learn more about our services on our website or call 0151 345 0520 to find out how we can help you or your loved one.

10/08/2020 - Tips for Keeping Cool in Hot Weather

While hot weather is nice, its crucial to know how to keep yourself and your loved ones cool. 

Too much heat is not safe for anyone, but it is even riskier if you are older or have health problems. 

I hope our tips can help you feel cooler, even on this scorcher of a day!  Let’s ‘Beat the Heat!’

1.      Drink lots of water– being hydrated will help your body maintain a stable temperature.  Iced water is the best thing to cool you down; but juices and fizzy drinks will also help.  Any liquid is better than no liquid!

2.       Avoid the sun between 11am and 2pm – this is when the sun is at its hottest.  If you are out and about seek shadier areas.

3.       Dress appropriately– wear loose clothing; cotton and linen are always a good choice!  Wear a hat; it will help keep you cool by providing a bit of shade.

4.      Pressure point cooling – use an ice pack to cool down your pressure points.  These are: ankles, behind the knees, wrists, elbow bends, neck and temple.

5.       Eat an ice lolly! – it’s a great way to cool down, and yummy too!

03/08/2020 - Funding Homecare: What are my options for Paying for Care?

When considering arranging care for yourself or a loved one, you will be thinking about how much it will cost, and whether you will receive financial support.

We hope the information provided in this blog will give you enough information to help you find the right professional financial advice and know what questions you will ask them.

So, what is available:

Local Authority Funding
Everyone in the UK is entitled to a care needs assessment; in England you can contact your Local Authority directly to request this. (Northern Ireland and Scotland do differ.)  The assessment will then identify if you are eligible for care and support, if this is the case you will have a Care Plan developed which will recommend the service you require to meet your needs.

Following this a Financial Assessment will take place; this is how social services determine how your care package will be funded.  They will look at your income and capital (including savings and property) to understand your ability to pay for your care yourself, and from this, how much you will be required to pay. In England if your capital is between £14,250 and £23,250, you will have to contribute towards the cost of your care. Over £23,250 you will be required to pay for your own care until the value of your capital depletes.

Direct Payments and Personal Budgets
A personal budget is the amount of money allocated by a local authority for your care.  This allows you to choose your own care, giving you control on how it is spent and on what services.

Direct payments describe how you receive all or part of the personal budget.  You can ask the local authority to organise the care on your behalf, however having direct payments allows you to choose the provider who delivers your care, giving you more choice and independence when making decisions about your care.

State Benefits
It is important to check that you are currently receiving all the state benefits that you are entitled to.  If you require support with this, you local Citizens Advice Bureau have free financial advice.  Some of the Key State Benefits are:
  • Attendance Allowance
  • Personal Independence Payments
  • State Pension
  • Pension Credit
  • Personal Expense Allowance

Self-funding (private)
Paying for your own care is becoming an increasing reality for many.  

There are many options that can help you do this:
  • Deferred Payment Scheme – this is a loan offered by your local authority to meet the costs of your care, secured on your own home at a fixed interest rate.
  • Savings
  • Selling or downsizing your home
  • Releasing equity from your home
  • Long Term Care Insurance

NHS continuing healthcare (CHC)
Some people with long-term and complex healthcare needs can qualify for nursing care, arranged, and funded by the NHS.  In these cases, it is the local Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) that hare responsible for the planning and commissioning of healthcare services not the Local Authority.  This funding is not means tested.

27/07/2020 - MyPlate for Older Adults - Healthy Eating

MyPlate was designed by American Nutritionists to help people improve their diets; it is a good reminder for us to eat healthier.

The traditional food pyramid is still available, but now in the form of a plate!  MyPlate has created two versions: one for people over 50 and one for the under 50’s.  This is because our dietary needs change with age.

As you get older your metabolism changes; this is a time when the traditional 3 meals a day become more of ‘little and often’.

One of the biggest changes with MyPlate is that it includes fitness activities as when you get older it is essential that you keep active.

It also emphasises fluid intake, taking vitamins and eating frozen or canned fruits and vegetables along with fresh.

So, what should your meals contain:
  • Whole grains and a variety of grains
  • Variety of fruits and vegetables
  • Low-fat and non-fat dairy foods
  • Oils low in saturated fats
  • Fibre-rich foods

All our Care and Support Workers are trained in the importance of Nutrition and Hydration, and we regularly support clients with meal preparation tasks.

20/07/2020 - A Day in the Life of a Care and Support Worker

Following our recruitment drive last week I thought it would be useful for you all to see what a ‘typical’ day could look like for our Care and Support Workers who visit numerous clients daily.

At Caremark we split our days in to 4 sections; care and support workers will be allocated to set sections throughout the day.

07:00-11:00 – Morning Calls
The first client of the day may require support with getting out of bed.  Bathing and dressing are common morning activities; this could take the form of prompting or full assistance.  This can also include continence support such as changing pads.  Preparing breakfast and medication tasks.  Our aim in the morning is to provide support that helps clients look and feel as good as possible when starting the day.

Some clients also require support with household tasks such as laundry, and basic cleaning chores.

11:00-15:00 – Lunch/Afternoon Calls
Clients receiving calls at these times are generally supported with preparing lunch.  Our Care and Support Workers will prepare wholesome meals to promote healthy eating and assist in maintain a healthy lifestyle.

These time slots are also used to support clients to access the community; the care and support worker may help the client with their grocery shopping, attend a social club or go to an activity of the client’s choice.

15:00-19:00 – Tea Calls
Care and support workers assisting at these times are preparing evening meals for clients; ensuring meals prepared follow the client’s preferences and is presented well.

Medication support is also popular at these times; especially for the clients taking medication at regular intervals.  Prompting/assisting or full administration are the levels of support that may be required.

19:00-22:00 – Put to Bed Calls
The last calls of the day are generally medication support and preparing a supper and a hot drink.  Care and Support Workers will make sure clients are ready for bed, make sure they have everything they need and that they are safe and secure for the night.  This can also include continence support; changing continence pads, attaching night catheter bags etc.

13/07/2020 - What are the benefits of taking part in community activities? 

  1. It gives you opportunities to connect with people; to develop and maintain relationships and friendships
  2. Ease stress and the feelings of loneliness
  3. Help maintain your independence and mental well-being
  4. Improve physical health; being more active and eating more
  5. Having a more restful sleep; being more socially active helps you to sleep better

What activities can we help you access?

  • Join a club or group – what activities interest you, gardening? Golfing? Reading?
  • Learning opportunities – attend classes where you can learn new things and expand your knowledge
  • Join a gym – attend fitness classes that are specifically for the older generation
  • Visit family and friends – let us help you stay involved in the lives of the people who mean the most to you

06/07/2020 - Why Live-in Care is becoming the choice over Care Homes


Deciding between Live-in Care and a Care Home can be a difficult one as fundamentally they offer the same things: long-term, round-the-clock care with expert professionals.  However Live-in Care is becoming a popular choice, as people don’t want to leave the home, they are comfortable with.

Advantages of Live-in Care:

  • 24/7 support and assistance
  • No need to move home
  • Continued independence
  • Constant companionship
  • Enables families or couples to stay together
  • Housekeeping services

There is also a big difference in the process of organising live-in care compared to a care home – it is a lot easier!

If you would like to know more about Live-in Care please click here.

29/06/2020 - Living well with dementia


  • Environmental Changes

One of the first and most important ways to support your loved one with dementia is by creating a ‘dementia-friendly’ home environment.
Think about how your home helps them live their life well, does it make the most of their independence and keep them safe?

  • Preserving Memories

A person with dementia often loses the more recent memories first, while distant ones remain for longer.  To help support the person you love, why not create a life story resource, this could take the form of photo albums, collage photo frames, a memory book, box or board.

  • Lifestyle

Diet – Make interesting and varied food that looks and tastes appetising.  Involve them in preparing food.  Avoid overloading the plate.  Remember to always provide a healthy balanced diet.

Exercise– try to make exercise fun.  Think innovatively: walk to local shops or cafes rather than driving there, for example.  If the person is less mobile there are seated exercises that you could encourage.

  • Keeping Socially Active

People with dementia are at a higher risk of isolation, loneliness, and depression.  Social activity needs to involve things they enjoy and meet people that are like-minded.

22/06/2020 - Love your Lungs Week


10,000 people are diagnosed with lung disease every week and approximately 1 in 5 people in the UK have developed asthma, COPD, or another long-term respiratory illness.  

Living with a lung condition can cause anxiety, especially when struggling with everyday tasks.


Our carers could help make life a little easier for you:

  • Do everyday jobs around the house – cleaning, cooking, washing
  • Give personal care – helping with washing and dressing, medication, eating
  • Emotional support – companionship, lending a friendly ear
  • Help with admin and finances – reading or writing letters, paying bills
  • Assisting with health appointments – booking, attending
  • Community Support – encourage you to keep active and help you to socialise


In addition to the above support our carers will be able to help you to learn ways to feel more in control of your breathing:

  • Agree activities that are priorities and plan the support visit so there is time to rest before and after them
  • Suggest you do things in ways that affect your breathing less, like sitting down to wash or prepare meals.

Could you benefit from some support?


15/06/2020 - Men's Health Week


It is Men’s Health Week this week and the theme this year is: ‘TAKE ACTION ON COVID-19

Did you know that men are twice as likely to die of COVID-19?

COVID-19 death rate:
Male: 91.2 per 100,000
Female: 48

North West England Statistics:
Highest rate in region is Manchester
Male: 154.4 per 100,000

What can we do to prevent the virus doing more damage?  

TAKE ACTION:
  • To avoid spreading the virus – the virus has not gone away.  To protect your family, friends, and yourself, keep washing your hands, maintain social distance and limit contact with others, even outdoors
  • To get the best out of lockdown and the ‘new normal’ – spending time at home can be a chance to slow down, read a book, learn something new or take up a hobby.  All these things are proven to improve mental well-being.
  • On social distancing – we cannot see Coronavirus, but we can see each other.  Social distancing by keeping 2m apart whenever possible in one thing we can do

Our carers can help in many ways; and they have the correct PPE to ensure they are able to keep themselves and our clients safe.  So, please don’t worry about organising support for your loved ones at this time, call us now for a free assessment

08/06/2020 - 5 Signs that your ageing parent needs help


You know your parents best, and some signs are easy to spot whereas others can be more difficult.  
Do any of the following signs seem familiar?

1.     Cluttered, untidy, or dirty home?
Is the home becoming unrecognisable? Are you spending your time cleaning and organising while visiting?

2.     Unkempt appearance
Is clothing dirty, worn, or dishevelled?  Are they neglecting their personal hygiene?

3.     Weight loss or poor appetite
Have you noticed that food is all pre-packaged, or that they are eating less?  Is there a decline in energy?

4.     Forgetfulness or confusion
Are they misplacing things constantly? Are they uncertain on how to complete the normal day to day tasks such as washing dishes or laundry?

5.     Not throwing away bad food
Is food collecting in the kitchen? Is the fridge or house smelling of rotten food?

After reading through these do you feel that your mum or dad does require some support at home?

Our carers can help in many ways; from prompting or assisting with personal care to helping with maintain the home environment.

We would love to discuss your individual home care requirements, be it by meeting, by email or over the telephone at a time that is convenient to you. If you would like to discuss this with one of the team, please get in touch on 0151 345 0520. Alternatively you can send us an email to Liverpool@caremark.co.uk

About Us

Our Care Services

Getting Started

How We Can Help

Live-In Care

Frequently Asked Questions

Home Page

Testimonials

Contact Us


Please tick the box before subscribing
Subscribe for News & Updates
TOP OF PAGE